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Fnha Tripartite Agreement

Fnha Tripartite Agreement

The United Nations First Health Authority (FNHA) is a health service delivery organization that manages a large number of health programs and services for people living in First Nations BC. The FNHA is part of a First Nations health governance structure in BC, which includes the First Nations Health Council and the Association of First Nations Health Directors. The World First Nations Health Agency grew out of a series of tripartite agreements between BC, BC and the Government of Canada, which included the Changeative Change Agreement: First Nations Health Plan [2006],[1] First Nations Tripartite Health Plan [2007][2] and the Tripartite Framework Agreement on First Nations Health Policy. [3] FNHA is the first provincial First Nations health authority in Canada. The FNHA plans, designs, manages and funds the provision of First Nations health programs and services in JC. These community services focus largely on health promotion and disease prevention, such as the signing on October 13, 2011, of the Reference Agreement, which has ensured that BC First Nations plays an important role in the planning and management of health services for First Nations through a new First Nations health management structure. The B.C. First Nation First Nation Health Governance Framework Agreement paves the way for the federal government to transfer planning, design, management and implementation of First Nations health programs to a new First Nations health authority over the next two years. The signing of the B.C. The First Nation`s Tripartite Framework Agreement on Health Administration is an important step in the tripartite First Nations plan signed in 2007. These agreements establish a tripartite commitment to improving the health and well-being of all First Nations in J.C., through increased First Nations decision-making, made possible by a new First Nations health management structure and a new health partnership with the federal and provincial governments. Our association and membership are well positioned to make a significant contribution to helping First Nations identify and achieve their own health outcomes, as policy discussions focus heavily on improving health services for First Nations.

Since 2005, First Nations in BC and federal and regional governments have committed, as part of the Transformative Change Agreement, to a common program to work in partnership to improve First Nations outcomes in several areas, including health.